How to use dowsing tools

The Dangers Of Using Dowsing Rods

https://youtu.be/dFKmIBIaZHo

The Dangers Of Using Dowsing Rods

How can dowsing rods be dangerous? It depends on your point of view.

For some dowsing skeptics, especially those who are deeply religious and who maintain that dowsing is something which has diabolical connections, the use of dowsing rods then becomes something which threatens the very soul of the dowser. The reasoning being that holding them and dowsing with them is to allow the Devil to work through you.

Now, that’s an extreme view but it is held by many such people. But, for them, it is a real and present danger. Of course, none of them would have actually tried to dowse so their opposition to the use of this skill is based only on their interpretation of the Bible or their own personal attitudes.

Admittedly, in the history of dowsing, there have been many religious people who have said the same thing about dowsing; that it must have some diabolical aspect to it, but there have been an equally large number of religious people who have used dowsing for themselves without any concerns for their personal salvation.

Therefore, this view of the dangers of dowsing has no real weight to it at all, based as it is on personal inclinations only.

As for other types of dangers in using dowsing rods, there are perhaps one or two possible things to bear in mind. If you have fairly solid rods, such as those made of steel, then there is a very slight risk that you could cause yourself an injury if you weren’t careful how you carried them or how you used them.

Personally, I tend to wander around with one rod stuck down the inside of my boot ready to stick it into the ground as a marker. If I carried either or both of them in my pockets – tricky but doable – then, if I tripped over, I suppose I could stab myself.

But, the good news is, I haven’t ever heard of any dowser who has been injured in such a way, so I suppose it’s not much of a danger at all.

The only other thing I can think of which might be thought of as a danger would be if you waved your arms around while holding a rod as you might put someone’s eye out. But, again, I’ve never heard of such a thing.

In which case, the only danger appears to be whether or not you consider that when using such rods you are putting your soul at risk. If you think that, then you’re not likely to dowse anyway. You have to go with what your conscience guides you to do. For me, that means I use dowsing whenever and wherever I can in perfect safety.

Have you ever experienced danger using dowsing rods? If so, please let us know in the comments section below.

Pendulum Healing

Pendulum Healing?

Dowsing for healing, sometimes thought of as dowsing healing or pendulum healing, is really the result of confusion and mis-information. The two do not go together. At least, not in the way that many seem to think that they do.

As an example, you will sometimes find people asking about pendulum healing or which are the best healing pendulums. They sound reasonable things to be asking, but they are really showing that they have the wrong idea about dowsing.

Let’s be very clear about this. Dowsing is a natural human skill. Essentially, it’s a simple idea. You ask questions about things your logical and rational mind cannot answer. And that is pretty much it. You can use tools or not as you prefer, but there really is nothing more to dowsing than asking questions and getting answers.

As you can see, there’s no room in that description for anything to do with healing or healing pendulums. So where did this confusion come from?

It probably came from the popular use of the pendulum as a dowsing tool. There’s nothing special about a pendulum when used for dowsing. It can be as fancy or as plain as you like. As long as it works for you, that’s fine. But, no matter what sort of pendulum you use, whether plain wood, or brass or a fancy crystal or a nut on a piece of dental floss, they all move in the same way; circles or side to side essentially.

Now, imagine the following scenario. There are two people. One is a dowser, and the other is someone who has an issue with her hand; pain perhaps in one of the fingers. The dowser is using a pendulum and it’s swinging in some fashion over the persons’s finger, presumably to locate the precise area of the problem. And, at the same time, the dowser is focusing on sending some healing energy to that finger.

Here’s where it gets important. The dowser is not using the pendulum to send healing energy. The pendulum has absolutely nothing to do with any healing. She is using the pendulum to locate where the healing energy is to be sent. She might also have set her intention so that when she has done all she can, the pendulum will indicate that she should stop.

As an onlooker however, all you see is the pendulum swinging, some healing taking place and the pendulum stops when it’s finished. It’s easy enough to think that the pendulum has something to do with the healing. But it doesn’t!

Therefore there are no healing pendulums. There are only people who send healing. You don’t need a pendulum or other tool for that. All you need is your very focused intention to send healing energy as well as you can. Intention is the key, not dowsing.

Even so-called healing pendulums will do nothing unless you intend an outcome. Otherwise they would be the wonderful magic bullet that would work on everyone, everywhere all the time. It’s intention which makes anything work.

So don’t think you have to buy anything special. You don’t. You just have to use your intention.

Happy dowsing!

Pendulum Movements Meanings

Pendulum movements meanings

Sounds like a mouthful, doesn't it? But this is a subject which crops up a lot particularly amongst new dowsers. They are using a pendulum and have got used to it doing one thing for a yes answer and a different thing for a no answer. Then, out of nowhere, the pendulum’s movement is new and different.

At that point, because they are new, they usually ask what does that change of movement in the pendulum mean? After all, a pendulum’s movements have to have some meaning, don’t they?

The point is, that question can’t be answered. That’s not to say that there is not an answer. There is. But the answer will be unique to that person. A pendulum’s movements meanings are different for different people. Your ‘yes’ and ‘no’ responses might be different to the next person’s responses. So, what is your ‘yes’ might be their ‘strange new movement’.

Despite not being able to answer one person’s question about what is happening when the pendulum moves differently, there are a range of possible reasons for it happening.

Now, note that I said this is a question which is mostly asked by dowsing newbies. That’s because everyone, after a while, finds a change of movement if they are using a pendulum. It’s the first time which catches people out. Also, newbies are not yet confident enough in dowsing to use it to find out what is going on. After all, they’ve only had maybe one or two short lessons and that’s it. The rest of the time, they’re on their own.

 

So, in no particular order, what follows are the list of usual reasons for strange or new pendulum movements.

  1. Your ‘yes’ and ‘no’ have changed. This can and does happen. Sometimes overnight.
  2. The question you asked is either a) poorly phrased, b) impossible to answer (for whatever reason), and c) one you do not have the skill / knowledge / permission to ask, or understand the answer (check which applies in your case)
  3. It’s a stupid or pointless question (i.e., a category which is not included in B above).
  4. You are not ready to have the answer. This applies more to those dowsers who have the belief that they have to be ‘connected’ to something in some way before they can dowse, or have to be protected by something or someone first.
  5. It indicates that someone or something is trying to make contact with you. Again, this only happens to those dowsers mentioned in 4 above.
  6. You simply lost focus when dowsing!

This list covers the usual reasons for strange pendulum movements. It’s up to you to find out what it means in your case.

But remember! Dowsing is all about asking questions. So, if something strange happens to your pendulum, then start asking about it and find out for yourself.

Has something like this happened to you when dowsing? Did you find out why? Let us know in the comments section below.

Dowsing Y Rods

Dowsing with Y Rods

Y Rods are a very old type of dowsing tool. One of the earliest pictures of someone dowsing shows them using this type y shaped dowsing rod.

It takes its name, obviously, from the shape. When such tools were more popular than they are today, they would be cut fresh from a tree or bush on site. After a few days, the wood would dry out and the rod would crack or split, so having a fresh rod was essential.

This type of rod was used mostly in water dowsing, or water witching as it’s sometimes known, although that first picture was showing its use for dowsing for metal ores.

Various dowsers have proclaimed that certain types of wood work better than others. Some dowsers have even said that the rod should be cut at certain times of the month. The truth is that, if you look at what successful dowsers have used, there is a huge variety of woods mentioned and the time of the month, the phase of the moon or time of day are disregarded. All those dowsers were looking for was a tool they could cut and use straight away while it was still supple.

The length of the rod is very much down to personal preference. Some people use a shorter length than others. Some use a very long length indeed.

Modern dowsers tend not to use fresh cut rods so much. Instead there are plenty of rods made out of a variety of materials which do not decay, dry out or snap easily. These tend to be of metal or plastic usually.

No matter what material the rod is made of, how it is used remains basically the same. The most usual method of holding the y rod is to have the hands palm up. I have seen it being held palms down, but, to me at least, it’s a more difficult method. The y rod works because of the amount of tension it is being held under. If you simply held it out in front of you by the ends, it probably wouldn’t do a thing for you. But, held under tension, the rod can move up or down very easily. In fact, if you’re not careful, you can get a nasty smack in the mouth from a longer rod while you are learning!

As with any type of dowsing, you have to have a specific and precise question in mind when using the rod. Being held in such a way as to apply pressure to the limbs of the rod, the point end of it will either flick up or down to indicate the answer to the question. For some people, a ‘yes’ response is an upward flick, for others, that’s what they get for a ‘no’ response. You have to find out what it is for you.

A y rod, no matter whether it is a forked stick or a modern metal version, is good for indicating location, as in water dowsing, or direction; turning slowly until you get a response.

Happy Dowsing!

Do you dowse regularly with y rods? What are they made of? Any tips you can add to this? Let us know in the comments section below

How To Dowse With A Pendulum

How To Dowse With A Pendulum

Many people, me for example, start out dowsing with a pendulum. They bought it because it looked nice and then they started to dowse with it. And that’s where the problems begin. There are all sorts of questions about dowsing pendulums for the beginner. Things like how do you use it? Are there pendulum dowsing instructions? How do you hold it?

We’ll try to answer those questions in this video.

First, it doesn’t matter what sort of pendulum you use, as long as you are happy with it.

Second, no matter how long or attractive the chain, or string or whatever is attached to the pendulum, you should not hold it so that there is a long distance between the pendulum and you. People do do that, and, yes, it works, but it is really slow and tries your patience and your arm strength if you are doing a lot of dowsing.

I really urge you to have a short length. It allows the pendulum to respond much more quickly. Trust me, you’ll like it and you’ll thank me for telling you. And what do I mean by short? Somewhere between two to four inches, depending on the pendulum. Yes. That short!

The movements of the pendulum are the things which give you the answers. But, and it’s a big but, the pendulum is NOT actually giving the answers. You are giving the answers. The tiny movements of your arm and hand are what make the pendulum move. Don’t ever fall into the trap of believing the tool is what is telling you yes or no. It’s you. Always you.

Your next question is, I know, what are the movements of the pendulum? You already know, I hope, that dowsing is a simple, natural, human skill where questions are formed to provide yes or no answers. But, how can a pendulum’s movement tell you the difference between the two? Simple. By moving in different directions.

You may find that some dowsers urge you to have a certain movement be your yes and another one to be your no. It’s easier to find your own motion. Begin to dowse by having the pendulum already moving. The general preference is having it move in a circle, either clockwise or anti-clockwise. It’s your choice. Then you ask yourself a simple question which can be answered only with a yes. Something like, ‘For breakfast this morning I ate a banana.’ Then allow yourself to not want a specific answer, just be interested in what it might be. Yes, you know what the answer is, but practice this bit, because it’s extremely important. Then keep an eye on your moving pendulum. Did it change direction, move to and fro or from side to side? Did it do nothing except keep moving?

Now begin again, get the pendulum moving as before and ask a question which can only be answered with a no. Something like, ‘Is it raining outside this place where I am right now?’ Again, be interested but not focused on the answer and watch the pendulum. Did it move in a different way? Remember, at first the movements might be slight.

You can try another few simple yes and no questions and confirm what happens for each.

Some usual responses are clockwise or to and fro for yes and anti clockwise or side to side for no. Yours may be different and that’s OK.

Now, you have to practice until the movements become second nature.

Happy Dowsing!

How to make L rods

How to make L rods

First, the reason they are called L rods is from the shape of them. L rods can come in all sizes and can be made out of a variety of materials. It’s up to you to decide whether you want heavy or light rods, or long or short rods. There are some very tiny rods available which are used for dowsing over maps. There are others which are much longer than your average forearm. The choice is yours. Of course, you can have as many types as you like, as you’re going to be making them!

Although L rods are always sold in pairs, you don’t actually need two rods, except on very rare occasions. So you can begin with just the one. It won’t matter at all.

The idea behind all L rods is that they should be able to held comfortably and to swing easily. Some people prefer to have rods with sleeves to hold, while others don’t care. I don’t have sleeves on my rods, but Maggie does. It’s just a matter of choice.

Simple rods can be made from lengths of brazing rod, for example, These are cheap and come in a variety of thicknesses. You can find one which is the right weight for you easily enough. To make it, you need to hold one end of it and mark slightly above that as the place to make the bend. Make sure that, when you hold it, there is enough length for it to feel comfortable.

You can also make rods from copper wire, but be aware that these types can be more easily bent in day-to-day use. Also, copper can be expensive, which might be another consideration. You can also use lengths of steel. Those are really hard to damage! My rods, for example, are made from plain steel. There’s nothing fancy about them at all. I often jam one of them into the ground as a marker when I’m working. You can’t do that with copper rods.

Another way to make an L rod is to take a wire coat-hanger and snip it below the hook and again half-way along the bottom part. Then it’s a simple matter of bending the resulting part into an L shape. Again, very cheap and easy, but liable to get bent through use. But they are good ones to learn with.

As for sleeves, as I said earlier, it depends on how comfortable or not you are using them. Maggie jokingly calls her rods, ‘girly’ rods, because they are so sensitive. I can’t use them, because they swing so much when I hold them.

The easiest way of making sleeves is by slipping a straw over where you hold it and then bending the bottom part up to keep the straw from falling off. You can substitute the barrel of a ball-point pen for the straw for greater durability.

The point you must keep in mind, no matter what type of rod you make, is that as long as it is responsive when you hold it, that is all that matters. Nothing else!

Watch our video on Dowsing with L rods for pointers about technique.

Happy Dowsing!

Let us know your thoughts on l rods in the comments section below. Do you have a favorite one? Or do you also use them as a pair? What are they made of? Do let us know!

Dowsing with L Rods

(Transcript below if you prefer to read)

Dowsing with L rods

L rods are the second most popular tool for dowsing, after the pendulum. Sometimes they are called divining rods, although that is not an accurate term as the word ‘divining’ tends to make people think of some supernatural insight into the future, which is not what dowsing is.

Often people will ask how dowsing rods work. The simple answer is that they work because the dowser is making them move. And that happens because of tiny movements in the dower’s hand and arms which are subtle reactions impossible to stop.

With a pendulum, pretty much everyone can hold one so that it dangles below their hand. However, L rods require a little more sophistication in the way they are held. Because they are rods with handles, they have to be held in such a way that they can move easily to one side or the other, or cross over in front of the dowser. That means they cannot be held too high up, or they will fall back o the dowser, nor can they be held too low, as they will only dangle uselessly.

The ideal position is just below the horizontal. The hands and arms should be as relaxed as possible and still hold the rods easily in that position. If the thumbs are on top of the rods, they simply won’t move, so make sure that the rods can swing by making small movements with your arms or hands. When you’re happy with that, get the rods back to the start position and hold them steady there.

Most rods come in pairs, but you don’t actually need two at a time for most dowsing purposes. So, if you find that one hand is more sensitive, go with just that one to begin with.

To use dowsing rods, you must, as always, have a clear question in mind and then get into the dowsing state which allows the answer to come without your emotions blocking it. For most dowsers, a yes is when the rod swings inwards toward the body. Conversely, a no is when it swings outwards. Of course, your response might be different. Practice and see.

Rods are most often used outside for location purposes. When using dowsing L rods in this way, you need the same precise question and the same dowsing state. Assuming you are walking across some land to find an answer to your question, you will need to decide in advance what will be a ‘yes’ for you when you have found it. It could be when your leading foot is over it, when your hands are over it or even when the tips of the rods are over it. As long as you know what will be the trigger of the response to move the rods, you will be able to locate what you are looking for.

Of course, there’s a whole lot more to both dowsing and L rods, but this should be enough to get you started.

What do you use L Rods for? Share your ideas and techniques in the comments section below

Types of Dowsing Pendulums

(Transcript of video is below, if you prefer to read)

Types of Dowsing Pendulums

Hi, this is Nigel from discovering dowsing answering your questions about dowsing.

Dowsing pendulums

Pendulums are a very popular dowsing tool and are easily purchased or made. The reason for them being so popular is because they are so easy to carry and use. Because of that popularity there are a number of questions which are frequently asked about them. For example, people always want to know which is the best pendulum for them to use. Or, they want to know about the different types of pendulums.

If you consider that a pendulum is nothing more than a weight at the end of a chain or string of some kind which allows it to swing freely, then the only two important aspects to consider are the weight of it and the material it is made out of.

Those two things by themselves mean that it is impossible to answer the question as to which is the best dowsing pendulum to use because what feels right for one person will not feel comfortable for another. If one person likes a brass pendulum, another dowser might prefer one made of wood or a small crystal.

 

Generally, when starting out, those new to dowsing tend to prefer light-weight pendulums made of crystal or wood. Heavier pendulums made of brass in various shapes are also popular.

So let’s take a quick look at the various types of pendulums available.

First are the light-weight varieties made of crystal, precious or semi-precious stones. They can be quite fancy, but if you’re not careful, they can be damaged through use.

Next are the wooden ones. These are often carved into interesting shapes, such as an acorn shape. These tend to be lightweight as well, but also more durable.

Following them we have the ones made of brass or other types of metal. These come in all sorts of shapes and sizes and are amongst the heaviest pendulums around. They are very popular. Again, they are very durable.

What is often confusing for newcomers to dowsing is that they hear that certain shapes of pendulums are better for certain types of dowsing.

That is not true. A pendulum, as was said earlier, is nothing more than a weight on a cord. When it moves, it moves because the dowser’s reaction causes it to move. Doesn’t matter whether it’s a really heavy one in an intricate shape or a nut on a length of dental floss, it’s the dowser who makes it move.

A pendulum, by itself, does nothing. Remember that.

Also if you believe that a particular pendulum works best for certain types of dowsing, then your belief will be strong enough to make it true for you. That does not mean that it is true for anyone else.

Basically, a pendulum is just a tool and nothing more. So make sure you find one that you like, for whatever reason, and dowse with it!

Happy dowsing!

Do you have a favorite type of dowsing pendulum? Let us know in the comments section below.

Dowsing Tools

Dowsing Tools

[Transcript, if you prefer to read] Dowsing tools come in all shapes and sizes. They also come with a wide range of price tags; from absolutely free to absolutely astronomical.

However, no matter what tool you use, they all do the same thing. That is, they react to and amplify your own body’s reactions. Once you get that straight, then it really becomes a matter of finding which type of tool is best suited to your reactions.

Before we look at some dowsing tools, you should be be aware that, actually, you don’t need any tools to dowse with. And that’s because dowsing is an entirely natural human ability whereby you can gain answers to questions which your rational, logical mind cannot provide.

But, as this video is about dowsing tools, let’s take a look at some of them, beginning with the simplest and moving to the more complicated.

First, the simplest tool of all is a branch. It should be long enough to dip in front of you when you hold it. Depending on how your body reacts, the branch might move up and down or side to side or go in a circle to show you a ‘yes’. That’s about as simple as it gets.

A more modern version is a bobber. This is smaller than the branch. They tend to be clunky and long and get bent easily, as they are usually made out of copper wire. But you can easily make smaller, more durable ones out of a length of speedometer cable stuck in a wooden handle. They operate the same way as the branch.

A more complicated version of the bobber is the aurameter, which is usually expensive and is supposed to be more sensitive in its responses. But it essentially does the same thing as the first two.

Next up in simplicity is the pendulum. Any weight at the end of a length of string or chain will do. Car keys, three-quarter inch nuts, carved wood or turned metal; all will work. If a bobber sticks out in front of you, then a pendulum is exactly like a bobber only the movements take place below your hand, instead of in front of it.

Common movements for ‘yes’ are clockwise circles or to and fro movements. ‘No’ is often shown as anti-clockwise or side to side.

An L rod is probably the next one to look at. Again, you can spend vast amounts of money or make your own. It’s your choice. Here, the tool is held above the hand and rod swings to the left or right according to your body’s reactions. If using two rods, then having them cross in front of you is often a ‘yes’. When they move apart, that is a common ‘no’ response.

Then we come to the Y rod. This is sometimes seen as the ‘traditional’ tool for dowsers because it’s the one most often seen being used by water dowsers. And water dowsing is a public exhibition of dowsing more than any other type of dowsing. The point about the y rod is that it can be tricky to hold out in front of you correctly. Once you succeed, then the most usual ‘yes’ response is a sharp movement down.

These are the main types of tools. They work by being held in front of you, or by being dangled from your hand and they all show you what your body is sensing.

There are plenty of variations on these types, and some might be more appealing to you than others. Most dowsers have more than one type of tool and often have different versions of one type as well. So, you might have more than one pendulum as well as some l rods.

No one tool is perfect. It all depends on your preferences and sensitivities.

Happy Dowsing!

Do you have a favorite dowsing tool? Let us know in the comments section below.


Getting started with pendulum dowsing

Pendulum dowsing

Getting started with pendulum dowsing.

Before using the pendulum for dowsing, you need to be in the right frame of mind. That means you aren’t emotionally involved in wanting a particular answer, just that you are interested in the outcome. It’s more curious than anything, a sort of detachment from the world, if you like. It’s called the ‘dowsing state’, and it gets easier to master with time and practice.

There are some important things to remember when starting using a pendulum for dowsing.

Firstly, you should be holding the pendulum in such a way that it can react quickly and smoothly to show the answer. That means you hold it with a short length of chain or string or whatever, and that you have it moving to begin with. Too many people start out with the pendulum absolutely still, dangling at the end of a long length of chain and wait for ages for it to begin moving.

So, remember: a short chain is better than a long one.

Second, you have to find which movement of the pendulum is showing you a ‘yes’ response and which is showing you a ‘no’ response. There are two ways of doing this.

The first way is for you to choose how you want your pendulum to move for each response and then you practice this repeatedly until it becomes natural. There is no standard here. It is down to you and what you want it to be. Some common movements are to and fro for ‘yes’ and side to side for ‘no’, or clockwise circle for ‘yes’ and counter-clockwise for ‘no’. Once you have decided which you like, then you simply practice moving the pendulum in each direction while making it very clear in your mind which is which. This is often called ‘programming’. When you are happy with the movements, you can then test them with the questions you’ll see in the second method.

The second way of finding the ‘yes’ and ’no’ for your pendulum is to have it moving in a ‘neutral’ way. This movement, neither ‘yes’ nor ‘no’,  is called the ’neutral’ or ‘ready’ swing, because it’s ready to move in the direction of ‘yes’ or ‘no’. A very useful neutral swing is one which is at 45 degrees as you look down on it. Get it going and then make a true statement similar to the following: ‘I was born, in this lifetime, in…’ wherever you were born. As it’s a true statement, you are expecting the pendulum movement to change in some fashion. It might take a bit of time at first, so you need to be patient. Then you need to repeat the process with a false statement of where you were born. Again, watch the pendulum for a change of movement.

Getting started with pendulum dowsing

It doesn’t matter which of the two methods you use to find your ‘yes’ or ‘no’. But, for each of them, when you are dowsing, you need to start your pendulum in that neutral or ready movement, so that it can respond quickly.

As with anything new, it might take a little time and practice to get to the point where the difference between the ‘yes’ and ‘no’ is clear and happens quickly. When getting started with a pendulum you just keep at it until you are confident that you can tell the difference between the two and also you can see the change from the neutral or ready movement happening quickly.

The other important thing to keep in mind when starting pendulum dowsing is that you need to make sure that the question you ask when you dowse is a good one. By that, I mean that it covers every pertinent aspect of the situation and can only be answered by a ‘yes’ or a ‘no’. Without going into too much detail, you should make sure that your question includes the following aspects: who, what, where, how, why and when.

Without a good question you won’t get a good answer. A vague question gives a vague answer; it’s that simple. This is true for all types of dowsing.

And, lastly, for all types of dowsing, remember that it is a skill and that any skill can be improved with practice. So take the time to master it. It’s well worth it!

Happy Dowsing!

Did you find this helpful? Let us know in the comments section below. Feel free to add other ideas for anyone starting out pendulum dowsing